gypsybelly dance museumgalleryshopmusicbelly dance infoalmeh
home | museum | shop | music | info

Hatshepsut and other dances,

Hatshepsut on APPLE I-TUNES
* Buy digital Hatshepsut
Hatsepsut CD internationally available on CDbaby, including Hatshepsut part I
* More pharaonic music tracks on CD here (Hatshepsut part III and IV) Get it with your PAYPAL account
Buy "Hatshepsut and other dances" on iTunes Music Store! you can buy individual songs or full album - (You need to have iTunes installed) simply type in "Abdel Hazim" in the search box

More on dance in ancient egypt: pharaonic music and dances
A CD by produced by Abdel Hazim tightly fit for bellydance classes and special shows, especially for Tribal Bellydance Style, an overview of Arabic rhythms used in belly dance music.

  1. Hatshepsut part1 3:06
    Pharaonic music track featuring Abdel Hazim on guimbri
  2. Chaleezji 1:56
    [mp3 extract 601kB]
    Tribal dance music of the Gulf region (or Khaleej area)
  3. Hadari 2:22 a swinging trance dance rhythm
  4. Snakedance 4:57 first time a slide guitar was used in a shifte-telli
    Very old analog recording done in Assouan, Egypt.
  5. Maqsoum 4:01 Maqsoum means literally "cut in half"
  6. Derboukka solo 2:59 by master percussionist from Lebanon Abed Helebi.
  7. Ayoubi 1:46
    Music for the zar dance, a kind of healing ceremony. Rhythm used in "zar" ceremonies.
  8. Leff Sariya 2:05 An oriental dance beat
  9. Baladi seghir 2:49 [mp3 extract 601kB]
    or "small" masmoudi beat - really haunting beledi rhythm.
  10. Saaidi 4:02 [mp3 extract 601kB]
    A lebanese version of the popular egyptian saïdy rhythm. Very often used in a cane dance.
  11. Hatshepsut reprise (woodwind quintet) 3:03

    Hatshepsut: pharaonic music, dedicated to queen Hatshepsut, a 18 th dynasty pharaoh who was one of the few female rulers in Ancient Egypt.

Links

Hatshepsut
Payplay
http://payplay.fm/abdel
Tradebit
http://www.tradebit.com/filedetail.php/106372
Emusic
http://www.emusic.com/album/10847/10847554.html?fref=700329

Some critics

Excellent! The perfect beat for practicing or performing.
Reviewer: C Boykin
I will be donating some of my other bellydance cd's. This cd HATSHEPSUT gets you in the right mood and has the PERFECT beat.

Reviewer: Hanako
Hi I'm from Japan! ... the CD that I bought was just what I expected and I'm very happy :) it's different from any other tribal bellydance CDs that I find out here in japan and I loved it. Very Awesome Serivce and Sounds

Reviewer: Katrina
Thank you soooo much for the great music. I have been playing it non-stop during my longworking hours...

Some mails after purchasing the Hatshepsut CD:

Email from VIONETTE PIETRI
IT IS AWERSOME!!! YOUR MUSIC IS ONE OF THE BEST THAT I EVER HEARD. I WANT TO USE IT FOR THE OPENING OF A BELLY DANCE VIDEO THAT I AM GOING TO MAKE. I CHOOSE YOUR MUSIC AFTER BEING MORE THAN A WEEK HEARING DIFFERENT ARABIC MUSIC.
Hi; i'm a belly dancer i love those musics it inspire me a lot i would like to have more CD in Abdel Hazim & Abed Hakabi i love those music i want have this Cd so bad please send that kind of CD they have great song in it
Thank you for your inspire musics.
Abed Halabi
I bought this CD on a whim, and it ended up being my favorite of all the ones I purchased. "Hatshepsut" (both versions, one is Ayoub and one is beledi), Maqsoum, and the Derboukka solo are the best, but all are great! Very danceable music that is different from everything else!
by Sandra
ABDEL HAZIM: Fusion BellydanceABDEL HAZIM: Bellydance revolutionsABDEL HAZIM: Tribal BellydanceABDEL HAZIM: Tribal beats including HatshepsutABDEL HAZIM: Wadi haflaABDEL HAZIM: transcendent bellydance

Hatshepsut: the Queen that was a King!

The story of Hatshepsut

The pharaonic style music compositions are dedicated to queen Hatshepsut or Maat-ka-Ra: a 18 th dynasty pharaoh who was the first one of the few female rulers in Ancient Egypt. Her reign 1479 - from B.C. to 1458 B.C - was the longest of all the female pharaohs. When her two brothers died, she was in the unique position to gain the throne when her father died. A female pharaoh was unprecedented.

Of course there were Egyptian pharao's before Hatshepsut, like Nitokerty and Sobeknefru who only ruled five years. After Maat Karé there was queen Tawosret who rule around 1198 until 1190 BC and still later Cleopatra VII.
Traditionally, the rulers of Egypt were male. Consequently, when Hatshepsut assumed the titles and functions of king she was portrayed in royal male costumes. Such representations were mere political statements. She actually looked more feminine - breast and a female torso - than the statues and wall paintings reflected. Queen Hatshepsut organized an oversea trade mission to the land of Punt, Abyssinia, at the horn of Africa which took 3 years. From there they imported the resins gained from the incense-tree they needed for religious occasions.
On those religious festivals, group dances were performed. The dancers were sometimes almost completely naked, except for the hip belts (as a protection against evil spirits) often containing amulets and some necklaces. Nudity was very much a part of Egyptian society (only the lower castes of course). In the Old Kingdom and Middle Kingdom, women danced bare breasted as was done in other parts of Africa as well.
Harem girls were known as the "adorned ones" and had to entertain their master. Harem women and society ladies were instructed by choir masters and mistresses of dance as part of their education as was later also done at the Ottoman court. They also learned to play the lute, the lyre, the harp and, most importantly the sistrum and menits which were religious instruments. Banquet and harem dances were certainly more refined and sophisticated than the street dances. They featured solos as well as group dances. Group dances were choreographed and solo dances were merely improvisation. They used a system for choreographic notation. These steps and gestures had names such as "the calf, the successful-capture-in-the-boat, the leading-along-of-an-animal, the fair-capture-of-the-beauty, the taking-of-the-gold and the colonnade."
Some of the movements used in ancient egyptian dances could still be seen in the dances of indian communities on the islands of western Africa.

The death of Hatshepsut is still covered with mysteries. Maat-ka-Ra reigned for fifteen years and when she disappeared Tuthmose III took the throne. Driven by hatred Tuthmose erased everywhere her name and destroyed the monuments erected by Hatshepsut. That was about the only thing he did as he was completely incompetent to rule Egypt, the most powerfull nation on earth at that time. Although the temple at Deir Al Bahari still stands, neither her tomb nor her mummy has ever been found. Hatshepsut was the only female pharaoh to erect the most monuments. Senenmut or Senmut - of black African descent - was the chief architect of Hatshepsut's works at Deir el-Bahri.

The wood for the temples and boots were cut in the woods of neighbouring Saudi Arabia.


homemuseumshopmusicinfo